Artist Reception: Environment Shifts: Hartwell

Hartwell (620 W South St, Raleigh, NC 27603) 20 September 2022
Hartwell (620 W South St, Raleigh, NC 27603) 6 to 8 pm

Curated by Charlotte Russell Contemporary, Environment Shifts features five Triangle-based artists: Sayde Laine Anderson, Mar Hester, Todd Jones, Susan Kelly, and Caprice McNeill. The artworks on view explore shifts in enviornment from our inner world to external reality to domestic spaces to natural landscapes, and the natural world. Enviornment shifts willl be on view September 1 through December 1, 2022 with an artist reception on Tuesday, September 20, 2022, 6 to 8 pm. 

Sayde Laine Anderson is a multidisciplinary artist, community builder and maker working across disciplines to explore environmental and social issues through traditional craft techniques based in Durham, North Carolina. 

 

Durham-based artist Mar Hester’s work challenges the traditional means of viewing photography while commenting on our ever-shifting environment. It is her hope that through the reconsideration of the familiar, what we can truly learn to evolve.

 

Todd Jones reformulates the discarded and mistint paints into a visual record of cultural history through material transformations by pouring numerous layers to create strata-like forms that mimic natural sedimentation. The new relationship of each color layer is exposed through excavation and creates a cultural snapshot that examines the development of our society through patterns of culture/identity shedding. Jones recently moved to Raleigh, NC. 

 

Raleigh-based artist Susan Kelly’s work is experience of landscape. In collaboration with her artist husband Daniel Kelly, they rove this earth in mutual fascination of terrain, cameras ready. Although some of her abstract landscapes are solely created from the memory of experiencing a place, these recent works are created by Daniel starting with an underpainting of a photograph of a particular place. Susan then paints the experience of that place over his underpainting. Mood, seasonal light, temperature, interstitial space, sound, inner reflection and memory motivate her exploration with paint.

 

Caprice McNeill’s pieces are rooted in and interpreting the cyclical pattern of nature as represented by butterflies. Recently she started to experiment with the incorporation of actual butterflies in the work, attaching ethically sourced specimens and not preserving them in any form of medium, realizing that they will over time continue to reveal the ephemeral aspect of life.